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Full text of "Announcements"

Catholic Theological Union 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1971-1972 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Incorporated by the State of Illinois, 
as an institution of Higher Education, 
November 27, 1967. 

Approved as a Degree-Granting Institution 
by the Department of Higher Education, 
State of Illinois, September, 1969. 

Associate Member of the American 
Association of Theological Schools, 
December, 1970. 

Pre-Accreditation Status, American 
Association of Theological Schools, 
December, 1970. 

Charter Member, The Chicago Cluster 
of Theological Schools, 1970. 

Approved for Veterans' Benefits, 
Title 38, U.S. Code, Chapter 36, 
September 23, 1970. 

Member of the National Catholic 
Educational Association, The Association 
of Clinical Pastoral Education, The 
Midwest Association of Theological 
Schools, the Association of Chicago 
Theological Schools. 



CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 
AT CHICAGO 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 

1971-1972 



The Franciscans 

Sacred Heart Province 
The Passionists 

Holy Cross Province 
The Servites 

Eastern Province 
Society of The Divine Word 

Northern Province 

5401 South Cornell Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60615 
(312) 324-8000 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 




4 CALENDAR 

5 GENERAL INFORMATION 

13 ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

19 STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

23 ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

43 COURSE OFFERINGS 

60 REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1971-1972 



Sept. 30-Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 4 
Nov. 1 
Nov. 25-28 
Dec. 2-3 
Dec, 8 

Dec. 13-17: 

Dec. 17: 



Fall Quarter 

Orientation for First- Year Students 
Late Registration — Change of Registration 
Classes begin 

All Saints Day — No Classes 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Registration for Winter Quarter 
Feast of the Immaculate Conception — 
No Classes 

Week of make-up Classes and Examinations for 

Fall Quarter 
End of Fall Quarter (4:00 P.M.) 



Winter Quarter 

Jan. 3: Classes Begin. Late Registration. 

Feb. 4: CCTS Inter-School Workshops 

Feb. 22-23: Registration for Spring Quarter 

Mar. 10: Last Day of Classes for Winter Quarter 

Mar. 13-15: Winter Quarter Examinations 

Mar. 15: End of Winter Quarter (4:00 P.M.) 



Spring Quarter 



Mar. 27 
Mar. 30-Apr. 2 
May 11 
May 15-16 
June 5-9 

June 9: 
June 10: 



Classes Begin — Late Registration 
Easter Recess 

Ascension Thursday — No Classes 

Registration for Fall Quarter, 1972 

Week of make-up Classes and Examinations for 

Spring Quarter 
End of Spring Quarter (4:00 P.M.) 
Final Convocation 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




HISTORY 
PURPOSE 

BUILDING AND LOCATION 
LIBRARY 

CLASSROOM FACILITIES 
ATHLETIC FACILITIES 
FEES 



HISTORY OF THE CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 



The Catholic Theological Union is a product of the open-window 
attitude of Vatican Council II. The documents on the Church, Reli- 
gious Liberty, Ecumenism, and the Church and the Modern World, 
charter a new age for the Roman Catholic Church. The seminary 
must reflect the new spirit. 

At the same time, on the American scene, there was a growing 
demand for creative approaches to Roman Catholic seminary educa- 
tion. It was felt that the day of the isolated, small, often under- 
staffed seminary, had passed. Catholic seminaries would do well to 
move into collaborative arrangements in order to pool resources of 
faculty, library and finances. Also, they must enter into the main 
stream of American seminary education by ecumenical and educa- 
tional contacts with Protestant seminaries. By and large, the Catho- 
lic Church in the United States is an urban institution. It was felt 
by many educators that the optimum location for the seminary is 
in a large city, near Protestant seminaries, and if possible, in a uni- 
versity environment. 

In May, 1964, Cardinal Suenens visited the University of Chicago 
for a series of lectures and ecumenical dialogue. As a result of his 
visit, Dean Jerald Brauer of the Divinity School met with representa- 
tives of Catholic orders to discuss the possibility of a Catholic semi- 
nary in the environs of the University. 

Three orders were intensely interested: the Services, the Bene- 
dictines and the Passionists. In 1965, the Franciscans decided to join 
the planning, while the Benedictines withdrew. 

The Franciscans of Sacred Heart Province had conducted St. Joseph 
Seminary at Teutopolis, Illinois since 1862. The Passionists of the 
Midwest Province, had opened their theologate in St. Louis in 1906. 
The Servite Seminary at Lake Bluff, Illinois, was successor to the 
first Servite Seminary in Chicago, dating from 1880. 

A formal petition for approval of the proposed seminary was 
forwarded to Rome by Cardinal Cody in May, 1966. Upon favorable 



6 



reply from the Sacred Congregation of Seminaries, the Cardinal gave 
his approval for the establishment of a combined seminary of the 
three orders near the University of Chicago, in January, 1967. 

Planning moved ahead very rapidly. General faculty meetings 
were held in May, 1967, September, 1967, and February, 1968. Com- 
mittees for curriculum, administration, spiritual formation, and real 
estate, studied their respective areas. 

A Board of Trustees was elected in August, 1967, and petitioned 
the State of Illinois for incorporation of a school of theology, the 
Catholic Theological Union at Chicago. After careful investigation 
of the purposes, faculty, library resources and financial assets of the 
proposed school, the State of Illinois granted corporate status to the 
Catholic Theological Union in November, 1967. 

After prolonged study of sites and buildings, it was decided to pur- 
chase the Aragon Hotel, 5401 S. Cornell, in East Hyde Park, a loca- 
tion some eight blocks from the campus of the University. This 
200 room hotel could be adapted for use during the initial years of 
the school. As the venture developed, planning would begin for a 
new building closer to the campus. 

Catholic Theological Union opened its doors in the fall quarter 
of 1968 with a faculty of 24 and an enrollment of 108. 

In July, 1969, the American Association of Theological Schools 
granted associate membership to Catholic Theological Union. After 
a hearing in September, 1969, the Advisory Commission on Degree 
Granting Institutions of the Department of Higher Education, State 
of Illinois, empowered Catholic Theological Union to grant the de- 
grees of Master of Divinity and Master of Arts in Theology. In 
July, 1970, the Northern Province of the Society of the Divine Word, 
which had conducted Holy Spirit Seminary, Techny, Illinois since 
1880, became the fourth member of the Catholic Theological Union 
Corporation. Meanwhile, four other religious orders had elected to 
send students to Catholic Theological Union on a tuition basis: the 
Augustianians, the Norbertines, the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart, 
and the Society of the Precious Blood. The Congregation of the Holy 
Spirit has students enrolled for the fall of 1971. 

In December, 1970, the Accrediting Commission of the American 
Association of Theological Schools granted pre-accreditation status 



7 



to C.T.U. In June, 1971, the Commission approved the Institutional 
Self Study Report submitted by C.T.U. Examination of the school 
by a team of visitors will take place in October, 1971. If all goes 
well, full accreditation will be granted in December, 1971. 

Catholic Theological Union is a charter member of the Chicago 
Cluster of Theological Schools, an association of five Protestant and 
three Roman Catholic Schools of Theology located in Hyde Park and 
the western suburbs. The Cluster has inaugurated full cross-registra- 
tion for courses, shared library privileges, and other forward looking 
educational collaboration. It is under the direction of a full time 
Coordinator, Rev. Robert Flinn, S.V.D. 

A collaborative program, by which a students at C.T.U. can earn 
the degree of Master of Arts in Theology from De Paul University, 
went into effect in the fall of 1969. This arrangement described on 
page 35, gives C.T.U. students a challenging option in their prepara- 
tion for ministry. 

Catholic Theological Union is now ending its third year of opera- 
tion. The school has shown a steady growth. It has achieved a 
greater internal unity and a more precise definition of purpose. It 
has been accepted by its peers in the world of theological education. 
There is solid ground for hope that this new venture, unique among 
Catholic seminaries, will continue to develop and prosper. 



PURPOSE OF THE CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 

The basic purpose of Catholic Theological Union is given in the 
by-laws: "To train and teach men aspiring to the Roman Catholic 
priesthood so that they may be fully qualified to meet the require- 
ments of such priesthood." 

There is a living sense of purpose which guides a school more 
effectively, perhaps, than any written statement. From the very be- 
ginning it was understood that C.T.U. would be a school for min- 
istry. Theology would be directed to practice. Nevertheless, as an 
institution becomes more deeply aware of its identity, it seeks to 
elucidate its purposes more precisely. 

Accordingly, in January, 1970, the Committee on Academic Affairs, 
made up of five faculty members, four students, and three from 



8 



administration, began work on a more fully elaborated statement of 
purpose. Some ten meetings in all were required before a statement 
that was acceptable to the C.T.U. community was finally hammered 
out. The statement reads as follows: 

The Catholic Theological Union is dedicated to the educa- 
tion of students interested in ministering to the contemporary 
world -as Roman Catholic priests. It also welcomes students in- 
terested in a graduate theological education in preparation for 
a variety of Christian ministries. 

Its vision of the effective minister includes a mastery of the 
Christian heritage, a basic understanding of the other religious 
traditions, individual maturity and sensitivity to the human and 
religious needs of men today, the ability for personal theologi- 
cal reflection and the communication of religious insights and 
values to others. 

It assures each participating community and diocese all the 
courses necessary for ordination in the Roman Catholic priest- 
hood. The school offers programs culminating in degrees of 
Master of Divinity and Master of Arts in Theology. The thrust 
of this school includes a strong academic program that en- 
courages serious theological research both on part of the faculty 
and of the students. 

The Catholic Theological Union envisions itself as an in- 
tegral part of the cluster of theological schools in the University 
area. Its role within the cluster is to offer a Roman Catholic 
presence and it commits itself to utilizing this ecumenical set- 
ting as far as possible in constructing its theological program. 

A statement of purpose and goals is never absolute. It is rather 
an attempt to state where we are at the moment. Such a statement 
would be expected to reflect the hopes, ambiguities, tensions, and 
contradictions that exist among the trustees, administration, faculty, 
students,, and the institutions which the school serves. It is like a 
political platform which is broad enough to include the goals of 
all and at the same time not precise enough to include in detail the 
particular agenda of each interest group. The lack of precision is 
seen as a strength rather than a weakness. Precision can divide 
as well as unite. 



9 



BUILDING AND LOCATION 



The Catholic Theological Union occupies a nine-story building 
containing some 200 rooms plus lounge areas and dining facilities. 
On the first floor are the receptionist's offices, a large lounge, the 
dining room and other service areas. The administrative offices, 
faculty offices, faculty lounge and seminar rooms are located on the 
second floor. The library and library offices occupy the entire third 
floor. The remaining six floors furnish residence for the faculty and 
students, with individual community chapels and recreational facili- 
ties. 

The Catholic Theological Union is located in the Hyde Park- 
Kenwood area of Chicago's south side. This is a cosmopolitan, vital 
community, with a strong sense of identity. Within walking distance 
are shopping centers, theaters, restaurants, churches, parks, the Lake 
Michigan beaches and the Museum of Science and Industry. Down- 
town Chicago is less than 15 minutes away by car or rapid transit. 
It is close to the University of Chicago and to the several schools of 
theology in the area: Chicago Theological Seminary, Lutheran 
School of Theology, Meadville Theological School, and the Bellar- 
mine School of Theology. 

It is not required that students reside in the CTU building. One 
group of Franciscans live in an apartment community near the school. 
The Augustinians reside about one mile from CTU. Holy Spirit 
Priory in nearby Kenwood serves as the Norbertine residence. The 
Divine Word Community has its residence in the immediate vicinity. 
A seminary which intends moving from its present location might 
consider purchasing a building of a size to serve its needs in the 
vicinity of CTU. As the school grows it is expected that a variety 
of residential patterns will be established. 



LIBRARY 



The entire third floor of the Catholic Theological Union houses 
the library. The area has been renovated to contain a large reading 
and reference room. Besides offices for the library staff, there are 
cataloging and work rooms. 



10 



The present collection consists of about 60,000 volumes, a com- 
bination of the libraries of the previously independent theologates 
of two of the charter members of CTU. Virtually all of the neces- 
sary periodicals for theological study and related areas of research, 
some 450 in number, are currently being received. 

With the entrance of the Divine Word Fathers into the CTU 
Corporation,' arrangements are being made for the incorporation of 
the extensive Missiological collection of the former Divine Word 
Seminary Library into the CTU Library. The Collection represents 
some 5,000 volumes in mission studies and the history of religions. 

The proximity of the libraries of the other theological schools in 
the area and of the library of the University of Chicago, especially 
of the Divinity School and the Oriental Institute, affords broad and 
valuable possibilities for consultation and research. 

Students of Catholic Theological Union enjoy reciprocal library 
privileges with the seven other schools of the Chicago Cluster, name- 
ly the Lutheran School of Theology, Chicago Theological Seminary, 
Bellarmine School of Theology, Meadville-Lombard School of The- 
ology (all in Hyde Park), as well as Bethany Theological Seminary, 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary, and De Andreis Theological 
Seminary in the western suburbs. The total holdings of the schools 
in the CCTS is around 500,000 volumes, and is the second largest 
cluster theological library in this country. 

The library is connected with the other libraries of the Chicago 
Cluster by a teletype service which gives instant contact for inquiries 
concerning titles and other library sharing. A courier service makes 
the rounds of the several libraries four times a week. 

The library is under the direction of two full time librarians, each 
with extensive background in both theology and library science. 



CLASSROOMS 

The education building of the Chicago Sinai Congregation is 
located at 5350 South Shore Drive, one block east of CTU. By 
special arrangement one floor of the education building, containing 
eight classrooms, has been made available to CTU. This arrange- 
ment has been quite adequate and will be continued. In addi- 



11 



tion, a number of seminar rooms for smaller groups are located in 
the CTU building. These facilities are adequate for our academic 
needs for the immediate future. In the fall of 1971 some CTU 
classes will be moved to Chicago Theological Seminary to facilitate 
cross-registration . 



ATHLETIC FACILITIES 

The Lake Michigan beaches and area parks with golf and tennis 
facilities are in easy walking distance from CTU. An arrangement 
is in effect by which CTU students make use of the Hyde Park 
YMCA athletic facilities, which include swimming pool, gymnasium, 
squash and handball courts. 



FEES 



Tuition $1,500.00 per year 

500.00 per quarter 

Special Students (for credit or audit) . 150.00 per course 
Student Activity Fee 4.00 per quarter 

Board (September 20-June 10) 750.00 

Private Room 750.00 per year 

250.00 per quarter 

Double Occupancy 450.00 per year 

(per person) 

150.00 per quarter 
(per person) 

Registration Fee 10.00 

Graduation Fee 25.00 

Transcript of Credits 2.00 



12 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 




OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
DIRECTORS OF FORMATION 
FACULTY 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



President 

Vice President and Dean 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Dean of Students 
Registrar 

Director of Library 



Paul Bechtold, CP. 
Hugh McElwain, O.S.M. 
James Hartke, O.F.M. 
John Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 
Judith Hochberg 
Kenneth O'Malley, CP. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Paul Boyle, CP. (Provincial) 

John Donaghey, S.V.D. (Provincial) 

Vitus Duschinsky, O.F.M. (Provincial) 

Justin Ryska, O.S.M. (Provincial) 

Robert Flinn, S.V.D. 

Mark Hegener, O.F.M. 

Robert Kohl, O.F.M. 

Augustine Kulbis, O.S.M. 

Edward McGuinn, S.V.D. 

Daniel O'Malley, O.S.M. 

Terence M. O'Toole, CP. 

Conleth Overman, CP. 

14 



DIRECTORS OF FORMATION 



Dismas Bonner, O.F.M., J.C.D. 

Michael Brophy, CP., M.A., M.Div. 

John F. Flynn, O.S.A., M.A. 

Philip J. Haggerty, C.S.Sp., M.A. 

George Lubeley, C.PP.S., S.T.L. 

Daniel Malain, CP., Th.M. 

Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D., L.Miss., M.A. 

John Paul, M.S.C, J.C.D. 

John Pawlikowski, O.S.M., Ph.D. 

FACULTY 

ARNOLD, Roger, S.V.D. Lecturer in Ethics; J.C.L., Gregorian Uni- 
versity, Rome; Graduate studies in Psychology, Loyola Univer- 
sity, Chicago. 

BOBERG, John, S.V.D. Assistant Professor of Mission Theology; 
S.T.L. , Gregorian University, Rome; D.Miss., Gregorian Uni- 
versity, Rome. 

BONNER, Dismas, O.F.M. Associate Professor of Canon Law; 
J.C.L., The Catholic University of America, Washington; J.C.D., 
The Catholic University of America, Washington. 

CROTTY, Nicholas, CP. Associate Professor of Ethics; S.T.L., 
University of St. Thomas, Rome; S.T.D., University of St. 
Thomas, Rome. 

DIDEON, Lois, R.C Director, Group Reflective Sessions; A.B., 
Seattle University; M.A. in Theology, Andover Newton Theo- 
logical School. 

15 



FOURNELLE, Geron, O.F.M. Professor of Old Testament Studies; 
S.T.L., The Catholic University of America, Washington; L.G. 
in Scripture Studies, Studium Biblicum Franciscum, Jerusalem; 
S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome. 

GEANEY, Dennis, O.S.A. Associate Professor of Field Education 
and Ministry; A.B., Villanova University, Philadelphia; M.A. 
in Economics, Catholic University of America. 

GOHMANN, Myron, CP., Associate Director of Library; L.Hist.E., 
Gregorian University, Rome; A.M.L.S., Rosary College, River 
Forest, 111. 

HAYES, Zachary, O.F.M. Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theol- 
ogy; S.T.L., Friederich-Wilhelm University, Bonn, Germany; 
Th.D., Friederich-Wilhelm University, Bonn, Germany. 

ISABELL, Damien, O.F.M. Lecturer in Spiritual Theology; S.T.L., 
Gregorian University, Rome; S.T.D., Gregorian University, 
Rome. 

JOHNSON, Basil, O.F.M. Lecturer in Liturgies; A.B. Quincy Col- 
lege; B.Mus., De Paul University; M.A. in Liturgy, Catholic 
University, Washington; S.T.D. (Cand.), Institut Catholique 
de Paris. 

KARRIS, Robert, O.F.M. Assistant Professor of N.T. Studies; S.T.L., 
Catholic University of America, Washington; Th.D., Harvard 
Divinity School. 

KNIES, Jerome, O.S.A. Lecturer in Patristics; B.A., Villanova Uni- 
versity, Pittsburgh; S.T.D. , Catholic University of America, 
Washington. 

LANGERHOLZ, Callistus, O.F.M. Associate Professor of New 
Testament Studies; S.T.L., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, 
Rome; S.T.D., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; L.G., 
Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome. 

MacDONALD, Sebastian, CP. Associate Professor of Ethics and 
Director, First- Year Program; S.T.L., University of St. Thomas, 
Rome; S.T.D., University of St. Thomas, Rome. 



16 



McELWAIN, Hugh, O.S.M. Academic Dean and Professor of Doc- 
trinal Theology; S.T.L., Pontifical Theological Faculty Mari- 
anum, Rome; S.T.D., Pontifical Theological Faculty Marianum, 
Rome; Graduate Studies in Education, DePaul University. 

MAINELLI, Eugene, O.P. Lecturer in Christian Education; A.B., 
Aquinas Institute, River Forest, 111.; M.A., Aquinas Institute, 
Dubuque, Iowa. 

MALLONEE, Robert W., S.V.D. Lecturer in Pastoral Care; M.A., 
Loyola University, Chicago; M.A.L.S., Rosary College, River 
Forest, 111.; C.P.E. Supervisory Certificate, Lutheran General 
Hospital and Wisconsin School for Boys. 

MEYER, Eric, CP. Instructor in Doctrinal Theology; Th.D. 
(Cand.), University of Muenster, Germany. 

NEMER, Lawrence, S.V.D. Associate Professor of Church History; 
L.Miss., Gregorian University, Rome; M.A. in History, Catholic 
University of America, Washington. 

NEWBOLD, Thomas More, CP. Professor of Pastoral Theology; 
Maitre-es-Sc-Med., LTnstitut d'Etude Medievale d'Albert le 
Grand; Ph.D., University 7 of Montreal, Canada. 

O'MALLEY, Kenneth, CP. Director of Library; A.M.L.S., Univer- 
sity of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 

OSTDIEK, Gilbert, O.F.M. Associate Professor of Doctrinal The- 
ology; S.T.L., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; S.T.D., 
Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; L.G., Pontifical 
Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; Post-Doctoral Study, Harvard 
Divinity Svhool. 

PAWLIKOWSKI, John, O.S.M. Dean of Students and Assistant 
Professor of Ethics; A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

PERELMUTER, Hayim Goren. Lecturer in Jewish Studies; B.A., 
McGill University, Montreal; M.H.L., Jewish Institute of Reli- 
gion, New York; D.H.L. (Cand.), Hebrew Union College — 
Hebrew University; D.D. (Honorary) , Hebrew Union College, 
Cincinnati. 



17 



SKERRY, Donald, S.V.D. Assistant Professor of Preaching and 
Communications; S.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome; S.T.D., 
Gregorian University, Rome; M.A. (Cand.) in Speech, North- 
western University. 

STUHLMUELLER, Carroll, CP. Professor of Old Testament 
Studies; S.T.L., The Catholic University of America, Washing- 
ton; S.S.L., The Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; S.S.D., The 
Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; D.H.L. (Honorary), St. 
Benedict College. 



18 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 




GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING 
DEAN OF STUDENTS 
WORSHIP 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING 



The thorough preparation of candidates for the ministry of the 
Catholic priesthood is a task that goes beyond the areas of academic 
and professional instruction. It involves the development of char- 
acter and Christian virtue. Likewise a sense of social responsibility 
must be fostered, bringing the candidate to an awareness of the de- 
mands of selfless service. While this is not the direct responsibility 
of the Catholic Theological Union, it is a matter of notable concern 
for the administration and faculty of the school. 

This facet of the student's development is remanded to the Direc- 
tors of Spiritual Formation of the several participating communities. 
By means of public conferences, group discussion and individual 
guidance sessions, the theological student is assisted in formulating 
ideals of life and service that are essential to commitment in the 
priestly ministry. 

The Directors of Spiritual Formation live in residence with the 
student community. They are available at all times for consultation 
and advice. Care is taken that this service does not produce depend- 
ent persons, but rather promotes full human and spiritual maturity. 



DEAN OF STUDENTS 

In addition to the Directors of Formation, the school maintains 
an office of the Dean of Students. The Dean provides personal and 
academic counselling to all interested students. He also assists them 
with all matters not directly pertaining to the Office of the Dean of 
Studies. The Dean of Students has direct responsibility for those 
students who have no specific spiritual director available to them. 



WORSHIP 

An integral aspect of education for ministry is the development 
of a liturgical way of life. The priest is not only a teacher of truth; 
he is president of a worshipping community. Worship in faith has 
ever been considered a necessary adjunct to the fruitful mastery of 
Christian theology. 



20 



At the Catholic Theological Union the participating communities 
determine their own prayer and worship schedule. A school chapel 
is available for the use of all the communities. On major Church 
festivals and other appropriate occasions the school holds official 
liturgies for the entire faculty and student body. These liturgies 
are prepared by the Dean of Students with the assistance of the 
Professor of Liturgy and a student committee. Besides communal 
worship, students are also expected to devote time each day to per- 
sonal reflection and private prayer. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The basic unit of student administration is the Student Senate 
Committee. It consists of four members elected annually on an at 
large basis by the student body. The principle function of the stu- 
dent senators is to represent the student body in the deliberations of 
the CTU Senate, the highest representative body in the school. In 
addition, they also fulfill many of the functions generally associated 
with student government. Students at CTU also have representation 
with full voice and vote on three principal school committees: Ad- 
missions, Academic Affairs, and Curriculum. 



21 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 




ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 
APPLYING FOR ADMISSION 
GENERAL REGULATIONS 
CURRICULUM 
DEGREE PROGRAMS 
PROGRAM IN MISSION STUDIES 
PASTORAL TEACHER EDUCATION 
PASTORAL TRAINING LABRATORY 
CHICAGO CLUSTER 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 



Pre- theological studies are the subject of much discussion and re- 
vision at the present time. Current Roman Catholic thinking on this 
subject is spelled out by the American Bishops in their 1971 Program 
of Priestly Formation. This document urges that on the college 
level prospective priests should be provided with an humanistic edu- 
cation in which the study of man in the context of world history and 
world cultural is central. Such an education requires familiarity 
with the behavioral and social sciences, the natural sciences and 
mathematics, history and philosophy, together with some introduc- 
tion to religious studies. Philosophy as an area of student concentra- 
tion is still highly recommended, but the Bishops' statement recog- 
nizes the value of having some students major in psychology, the 
social sciences, and the communication arts. CTU has adapted its 
admission requirements and recommendations (listed below) to the 
spirit of this new program of priestly formation. 

For the larger Christian theological community, the Statement on 
Pre-Seminary Studies, adopted by the American Association of Theo- 
logical Schools, furnishes significant guidelines. 

Traditionally, theological schools in America have expected 
their students to prepare themselves for theological study by 
a broad undergraduate program in the liberal arts. When it 
came to a choice of concentration, students were often encour- 
aged to major in classical languages, history or philosophy. 

Today, however, because of the wide range of undergraduate 
programs and majors offered by a great diversity of institu- 
tions of higher education, it is no longer feasible nor realistic to 
demand one particular type of undergraduate preparation as a 
prerequisite for theological study. Some of the ablest students 
in our theological schools have made their decision to prepare 
for the ministry after their undergraduate study was completed, 
or even after a period of time in an occupation apparently un- 
connected with the Church's ministry. 

In every case, the student contemplating theological study 
should correspond at the very earliest opportunity with the 
school or schools to which he intends to apply and with the 
authorities of his church in order to learn what will best pre- 
pare him for the specific program he intends to enter. It is 



24 



the judgment of the AATS that a normative pattern of pre- 
seminary studies will include many of the following: 

English language and literature; history, including non- 
western cultures as well as European and American; philos- 
ophy, particularly its history and methods; natural sciences, 
both the physical and the life sciences; social sciences, where 
psychology, sociology and anthropology are especially appro- 
priate; the fine arts and music, especially for their creative and 
symbolic values; biblical and modern languages; religion, 
both in the Judaeo-Christian and in the Near and Far Eastern 
traditions. 

Some seminaries require Greek or Hebrew for admission, 
and many advanced biblical courses are offered in the original 
tongues; modern languages have an immensely educative role 
and are required at the graduate studies level. 

In many seminaries students who have been well prepared 
in religion and equipped with the tools of theological study 
will be set free, not to complete their theological courses more 
quickly, but rather to pursue more advanced studies. The prin- 
ciple constantly to be kept in mind is not that of satisfying 
paper regulations and minimum requirements, but of making 
the most of opportunities for education. 

This statement, adopted by the Association after considera- 
tion and study by its membership, is issued for the guidance of 
persons considering application to a seminary and their ad- 
visors. In no way does it bind or limit the seminaries in their 
admissions policies. Each seminary is free to set its own en- 
trance and make-up requirements, to add to this statement or 
change its emphases. (AATS, Bulletin 27, June, 1966, pp. 35-6, 
passim.) 



PRE -RE QUISITE COLLEGE COURSES FOR CTU ADMISSION 

Students who have not fulfilled these pre-requisites will be admitted 
to CTU on probation and will be expected to complete these required 
courses as soon as possible during their first year of residence. 

A. 15 semester hours of philosophy which should include three 
courses in the history of philosophy. Other recommended areas 
of philosophy are epistemology, metaphysics and the philosophy 
of man. 

B. An introductory course in sociology. 



25 



C. Two courses in psychology. Experimental psychology and the 
psychology of personality are highly recommended. 

D. No college course may be substituted for an upper division 
course at CTU. 

E. A Bachelor's Degree or its equivalent from an approved college 
or university. 

RECOMMENDED COLLEGE COURSES FOR CTU PROGRAM 

The following are suggestions for courses that would enable enter- 
ing students to participate more fully in the CTU program. They 
are not prerequisite for admission. 

A. Courses in philosophy (in addition to those recommended above) . 
Courses in philosophy of ethics and linguistic analysis would 
prove of special value. 

B. Reading knowledge of French, German and Latin. 

C. Courses in psychology. Especially recommended are history of 
psychoanalysis, psychological methodology, depth psychology and 
social psychology. 

D. Cultural anthropology. 

E. A familiarity with modern theatre and Anglo-American literature. 

F. Survey courses in recent world history, political science and Ameri- 
can history. 

G. Courses in Old and New Testament. 

H. An elementary knowledge of Hebrew and Biblical Greek. 



APPLYING FOR ADMISSION 
General Admission Procedures: 

A. Submit transcripts of all college credits to CTU registrar. 

B. Have scores from Graduate Record Exam sent to CTU. 

C. Complete official application form and return it with the ten dol- 
lar matriculation fee to CTU (no application will be accepted 
without the fee payment) . 

D. Students applying for admission to CTU who do not belong to 
religious congregations officially connected with CTU will also 
have to provide three letters of recommendation. If the person 
belongs to a diocese or religious congregation, one of these let- 
ters must be written by an official representative of the diocese 
or congregation. If possible, there should also be a personal in- 
terview with the prospective student. The details of such an 
interview would be handled by the Academic Dean and the Dean 
of Students. 



26 



E. Previous theological credits earned by transfer students will be 
accepted towards the M.Div. once such students have suc- 
cessfully completed one year of academic work at CTU. 



F. CTU as such does not engage in psychological testing of its stu- 
dents. It considers such testing to be the competence of the 
respective religious congregations. It is recommended, however, 
that psychological test results be kept in the files of the respective 
formation directors at CTU. Psychological test results for stu- 
dents not connected with official CTU religious congregations will 
be kept in the files of the Coordinator of Student Activities. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

A. Registration for Courses 

Generally registration is announced in the calendar and takes 
place at least six weeks in advance of the quarter in which the 
courses are being taken. 

Changes in registration are allowed through the first week of the 
quarter. After that the course must appear in the transcript with 
some grade (cf. below, "grading"). 

B. Class Load and Class Scheduling 

All courses are three quarter-hour courses, that is, they meet 150 
minutes per week for ten weeks. The eleventh week in every 
quarter is examination week. 

The normal class load is 4 courses (12 quarter hours). Special 
permission is required from the Dean of Studies to carry more 
than 12 hours. A full time student is one who carries at least two 
courses. 

Classes are scheduled Monday through Friday generally in the 
morning and afternoon. Some evening classes are offered. 

C. Grading 

The letter grade system is used with some slight variation: A= 
Excellent; B=Good; C=Fair or Average; D=Poor; F=Fail- 
ing; WP=Withdrew, Passing; WF=Withdrew, Failing; PI= 
Permanent Incomplete. 

Withdrawals. — Students may withdraw from any course up to the 
end of the seventh week of the quarter. Approval of their advisor 
is required. They must follow the procedures established by the 
Registrar's Office. 



27 



Incompletes. — It is the perogrative of every teacher to allow a 
student an extension of his course work for any given quarter up 
to the end of the fifth week of the next quarter. If the student 
does not finish his work by the end of the fifth week of the 
following quarter, the teacher has two options in grading: "F" 
(failure) or "PI" (Permanent incomplete, i.e., work is no longer 
subject to completion. The student may take that course again, 
however, he must register again, pay tuition again, etc., as for 
any other course) . 

D. Transfer of Credit 

Credit may be transferred toward the Master of Divinity degree 
on the condition that the student successfully completes one year 
of academic work at CTU. 



CURRICULUM 

The curriculum of the Catholic Theological Union rests on the 
stated purpose and objectives of the school: 

The Catholic Theological Union is dedicated to the education 
of students interested in ministering to the contemporary world 
as Roman Catholic priests. It also welcomes students interested 
in a graduate theological education in preparation for a variety 
of Christian ministries. 

Its vision of the effective minister includes a mastery of the 
Christian heritage, a basic understanding of the other religious 
traditions, individual maturity and sensitivity to the human and 
religious needs of men today, the ability for personal theologi- 
cal reflection and the communication of religious insights to 
others. 

The educational aims of CTU flow directly from the goals articu- 
lated in this statement. It has taken the combined effort of a large 
segment of the CTU community to hammer out the optimal program 
to achieve the kinds of experience that prepare a student for min- 
istry. 

During the process of curriculum revision over the last two years 
a particular kind of ethos has emerged as characteristic of CTU's style 
of education. The school faced into some hard questions and succeed- 
ed in forging a curriculum consistent both with its educational 



28 



objectives and its concrete possibilities. The present curriculum is 
not considered fixed or final. It represents rather a first plateau in 
the school's on-going self-definition. CTU has now completed its 
third year of operation. The fruits of these years of shared experi- 
ence by the several previously autonomous groups are now ready for 
evaluation and some kind of common articulation. 

The basic curriculum at CTU is structured around the professional 
degree of Master of Divinity. The school also grants the academic 
degree of Master of Arts in Theology to students who qualify. These 
degrees are not thought of as mutually exclusive. The professional 
degree demands rigorous scholarly effort as well as the develop- 
ment of practical skills. The M.A. symbolizes the academic and 
theoretical dimension of the professional preparation for ministry. 

CTU envisions preparation for ministry in two quite distinct 
phases: (l) First Year Program; and (2) Graduate Professional 
Preparation. 

A. FIRST YEAR PROGRAM (FYP) 

The FYP clearly orientates the student toward the professional 
goal of CTU. It is structured to facilitate his entrance into the M.Div. 
program. This it does in several ways. First of all, it is characterized 
by a markedly interdisciplinary quality. Four professors conduct one 
phase of the program, in team fashion, with each of them repre- 
senting a department of the school, i.e., BLL, HDS, CMM, and Field 
Education. Their active presence on the team, in conjunction with 
the further courses they teach at the first year level in their re- 
spective disciplines, accounts for the interdisciplinary tone of the 
entire FYP. The team coordinator is a member of the CMM De- 
partment, and his overall influence effects the notably pastoral char- 
acter of the program. 

Further, great emphasis is placed on the active involvement of 
the student in his preparation for ministry, and this is achieved 
through student team-work, group projects, discussions, and the 
usual educational devices of readings, reports, and papers. This 
method is best illustrated in the way students actively involve them- 
selves both in the planning of the courses, as well as in their 
periodic evaluation. 

Finally, the content of the courses contributes significantly to the 
FYP. A concerted effort is made to introduce the student to the total 
dimensions of the human situation, especially its communal and 



29 



social aspects. This, in conjunction with the content of his Christian 
heritage presented in the BLL and HDS departments, constitutes 
the theological sources out of which he is "to do" theology. To use 
Paul Lehmann's phrase, "a running conversation between the New 
Testament, on the one hand, and our situation, as heirs of the New 
Testament on the other" is encouraged. A definite viewpoint on 
Christian life and ministry comes to the fore as a result of this 
orientation. 

Thus, the student carries twelve quarter hours each quarter, di- 
vided in this way: 



Fall Quarter: 

THE CHRISTIAN IN HUMAN COMMUNITY 
THE CHRISTIAN IN CULTURAL COMMUNITY 
NEW TESTAMENT INTRODUCTION 

EMERGENCE OF THEOLOGICAL THEMES IN THE EARLY CHURCH/ 
EARLY EXPANSION OF CHRISTIANITY 



Winter Quarter: 

THE CHRISTIAN IN SOCIAL AND POLITICAL COMMUNITY 
THE PERSON AS LOCUS OF COMMUNITY 
OLD TESTAMENT: INTRODUCTION 

HISTORY OF THEOLOGY IN THE MIDDLE AGES /CHRISTIANIZATION 
OF EUROPE 



Spring Quarter: 

CHRISTIAN LIFE AND HOLINESS 

CHRISTIAN MINISTRY TO CONTEMPORARY COMMUNITY 
THE BIBLE: ITS FORMATION AND INTERPRETATION 
CHRISTIANITY IN THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION 

30 



B. GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION 



In its study of the curriculum, CTU wrestled long with the ques- 
tion of professional preparation for ministry. What finally emerged 
was a consensus on these three dimensions or elements of sound pro- 
fessional education: (l) Theological content; (2) Ministerial skills; 
(3) Integrative education. 

(1) Theological Content 

There was a clear decision in the school on the need for a defini- 
tion of that basic content or theory which the student should have 
mastered as part of his preparation for ministry. It was the task of 
the several departments to lift out those areas which the student 
should encounter and for which he will be held responsible. The 
method of fulfilling that responsibility would be generally through 
specific courses in those areas so that there would be some on-going 
evaluation not only of the students' informed and critical encounter 
with the Christian heritage but also with contemporary Christian 
thought and its interaction with present-day culture. 

(2) Ministerial Skills 

In the process of examining this dimension of the student's pro- 
fessional preparation, CTU found it necessary to realign its whole 
departmental (divisional) structures. The object of this realignment 
was to provide for the creative interaction between the traditional 
communication skills (both theoretical and practical, i.e., pastoral 
counselling, preaching, etc.) and the relatively new possibilities for 
mission and ministry. This dimension of the students' preparation 
continues to be the object of extensive study and experimentation 
by the newly created Department of Christian Mission and Ministry. 

(3) Integrative Education. 

This third aspect of professional preparation for ministry at CTU 
is concerned with the difficult task of and possibilities for the stu- 
dent's bringing together his often fragmented experiences from the 
various areas of study and endeavor. Such efforts at integral and 
integrative education are expected of the student indeed, but the 
Faculty has also assumed a continuing role in making the student's 
task more realistic. The interdisciplinary character of the FYP, the 
projected yearly seminar on "The Task of Integration and Synthesis" 
and the Comprehensive Project for the M.Div. degree all point to the 
need for integral education in the student's preparation for ministry 
and the role of the Faculty in that integration. 



31 



FIELD EDUCATION 



Theological Content, ministerial skills and integrative education 
are brought to a certain focus in Field Education. Theory and skills 
of themselves do little for the minister unless in their acquisition 
they are integrated in such a way that they become part of the process 
of human growth. This presumes that the greatest resource of the 
ministry is a well integrated or developed personhood. 

The Director of Field Education at the Catholic Theological Union 
is responsible for placing individual students in specific and expertly 
supervised action programs. The Department of Christian Mission 
and Ministry is responsible for providing opportunities for theologi- 
cal reflection growing out of such programs. A variety of possibili- 
ties for field education exist in the local community (Hyde Park-Ken- 
wood area) and the larger Chicago metropolis (e.g., chaplaincies in 
the hospitals, correctional institutions, jails; the inner-city apostolate; 
radio and television communications; catechetical and youth coun- 
seling programs; various social action programs, Newman work, etc.) 

Each student enrolled in the Master of Divinity program will be 
required to spend eighteen quarter hours or the equivalent of two 
quarters in supervised field education programs. Students are en- 
couraged to enroll in a Clinical Pastoral Education program for one 
of the quarters. 



32 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 




for the M.Div. and they are thus divided: 
I. first year program (The following courses are all required): 



II. graduate professional preparation (Required in the fol- 



A. Dept. of Biblical Languages & Literature (BLL) . . 18 hrs. 
Area Requirements: 

1. Old Testament (9 hrs.) Three areas: 
Pentateuch or Deuteronomic Corpus 
Prophets 

Wisdom Literature or Psalms 

2. New Testament (9 hrs.) Three Areas: 
Synoptics 

Johannine Literature 
Pauline Literature 

B. Dept. of Historical & Doctrinal Studies (HDS) .... 33 hrs. 
Area Requirements: 

1. History (3 hrs.): Course in Modern or Contemporary 
History 

2. Systematics (30 hrs.) 

a. Doctrine (18 hrs.): God; Creation & Eschatology; 
Christ; Church; Sacraments (two courses, one of which 



b. Ethics (9 hrs.); One course in systematic ethics and 
two in ethical issues. 

c. Law (3 hrs.) : Theology of Law 



A. BLL 300, 305 and 310 

B. HDS 300 or 302, 305 or 307, and 310 

C. CMM 300, 305, 310, 315, 320 and 325 



9 hrs. 

9 hrs. 
18 hrs. 
36 hrs. 



TOTAL 



lowing areas) : 



must be on the Eucharist) 



33 



C. Dept. of Christian Ministry & Mission ( CMM ) 30 hrs. 
Area Requirements: 

1. Sacramental Law 3 hrs. 

2. Pastoral Counseling 3 hrs. 

3. Preaching 3 hrs. 

4. Mission 3 hrs. 

5. Field Education 18 hrs. 

D. Electives 15 hrs. 

III. COMPREHENSIVE PROJECT OR SEMINAR 3 hrs. 

TOTAL 135 hrs. 



MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.) — CTU 

If the student chooses to obtain the degree of Master of Arts in 
Theology from CTU, the following requirements hold: 

Prerequisites 

Beyond the general requirements for admission to the school, 
CTU requires that the candidate for the M.A. have completed the 
FY? or its equivalent. 

Language Requirement 

Besides possessing a reading knowledge of Latin, the candidate 
must be proficient in a foreign language. Specialization in a par- 
ticular department may indicate another language requirement, espe- 
cially in the area of biblical studies. 

Courses 

Twelve courses (i.e., 36 quarter hours) plus a master's thesis are 
required. All of these courses must be taken from the upper division 
offerings. The student must take his M.A. either in biblical studies 
(BLL) or in historical and/or doctrinal studies (HDS). He deals 
directly with the chairman of the department in which he will major. 
He must write his thesis in that department and half of his graduate 
courses must be taken in that department. The student must carry 
a "B" average in his course work. 



34 



Thesis 



The candidate must present a thesis which indicates in-depth study 
in some aspect of his major field. The thesis should conform to the 
characteristics of research and independent thought. It must follow 
the accepted norms of literary style for research papers. 

Final Examination 

After the thesis has been read and approved, the candidate must 
take a comprehensive examination drawn up by the department in 
which he majors. 



MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.)— COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 
AT DE PAUL 

A Master of Arts Program has been worked out cooperatively be- 
tween The Catholic Theological Union and De Paul University, the 
degree being granted by De Paul University. In general the Graduate 
Program offered by the Department of Theology of De Paul Uni- 
versity requires: 

1) Completion of forty-eight quarter hours of graduate study, of 
which up to eight quarter hours may be applied to the thesis. 

a) Eight graduate hours (two courses) must be taken in the area 
of Scripture; four quarter hours (one course )in doctrinal 
history of systematic theology; four quarter hours (one 
course) in religious ethics. 

b) In the allied field the student must take two of the following 
courses: Sociology 302 (Cultural Anthropology), Philos- 
ophy 365 (Philosophy of Religion), Theology 343 (Social 
Dimension of Religion) or Theology 440 (Religious Com- 
munciation). He must also choose a seminar in the philos- 
ophy department on some philosophy pertinent to religious 
thought. 

c) Thesis: Students will register for Theology 499 (Thesis Re- 

search) for eight quarter hours credit. 

2) One foreign language. Evidence of the candidate's reading 
knowledge of theological literature in German, French, Latin, 



35 



Greek, Hebrew, or with special permission, any other language in 
which thesis research will be conducted. 



3) A two-part written comprehensive examination in the field of 
biblical studies, doctrinal history, systematic theology and reli- 
gious ethics, each part taken for three hours. 

4) A one hour oral "defense of the thesis". 



DIRECTIVES FOR CTU STUDENTS IN THE DE PAUL M.A. PROGRAM: 

1) Prerequisites 

a) CTU students who wish to enroll at De Paul for the M.A. 
in Theology must have completed the prerequisite courses, 
that is, the First Year Program at CTU. 

b) Each student who wishes to enroll in the graduate program 
at De Paul must present a letter of recommendation to the 
Dean of CTU from the academic supervisor of his particular 
religious community or diocese. 



2) Requirements for the M.A. in Theology 

a) CTU students registered for the M.A. at De Paul are re- 
quired to take five courses (20 quarter hours) at De Paul; 
the other twenty quarter hours must be taken at CTU. 

b) The Master's Thesis (eight quarter hours) may be written 
under the direction of a faculty member from either De Paul 
or CTU. The student, however, must register for Theology 
499 at De Paul and follow the norms for thesis direction 
issued by the Department of Theology at De Paul. 

c) CTU students must follow the area and course requirements, 
language requirements, etc., as determined by the Graduate 
School of De Paul University. 



36 



PROGRAM IN MISSION STUDIES 



The Program of Mission Studies, which is being developed at 
Catholic Theological Union in collaboration with the Chicago Cluster 
of Theological Schools, aims to provide part of the academic prepara- 
tion and personal orientation that is necessary or useful for a person 
who is to share in the missionary work of the Church or is interested 
in this work. 

Under the direction of Father John Boberg, S.V.D., with the help 
of other Divine Word Missionaries and the enthusiastic and expert 
cooperation^ of Prof. James Scherer (LSTC) and Father John Hardon 
(BST), the program began in the school year 1970-1971 with a num- 
ber of course offerings. A more balanced and comprehensive list of 
course offerings has been lined up for the school year 1971-1972. As 
the rich resources of the immediate area and of Chicago in gen- 
eral shall have been developed, the present plans are to enlarge the 
program and open it to any interested students who wish to engage in 
mission studies. The plans include the eventual offering of a degree 
in mission studies. 

Four main areas or dimensions are covered by the program: the 
theological, the soeio^cultural, the religious, and the international. 

1. Theological Dimension. — Integrated into the overall curriculum 
of CTU and CCTS, the Mission Studies Program shares in the rich 
ecumenical offerings of theological courses of the schools. The theo- 
logical dimension of the program, therefore, aims to provide special- 
ized courses that develop the deeper and broader implications of 
theology for the understanding and implementation of the specific 
missionary activity of the Church. 

2. Socio-Cultural Dimension. — The missionary activity of the 
Church generally still means cross-cultural contact. This part of the 
program aims to provide the theory and the skills necessary for such 
work. In addition to specific courses in anthropology and sociology, 
an interdisciplinary approach is taken to such questions as community 
development. A specialized cross-cultural field experience will also 
be a part of the program. The purpose of this experience would be 
to ascertain and develop the cultural adaptability of the student and 
lead him to further reflection on theology against the background of 
this experience. 



37 



3. Religious Dimension. — The new vitality of non-Christian reli- 
gions demands an understanding on the part of the missionary of the 
religious phenomenon as such, as well as the rich variety of ways 
in which the basic religious experience has been concretized by men 
of all times and places. This would include general courses like 
the Philosophy of Religion or the Phenomenology of Religion, and, 
as the program develops and need arises, courses in specific religions. 
The neighboring rich resources of the University of Chicago are sig- 
nificant for this aspect of the program. 

4. International Dimension. — The missionary going overseas must 
see himself as something more than a plug filling up a hole or a poor 
substitute for a local minister. He must bring to the local Church a 
knowledge of the problem and a development that transcends 
any particular culture. He must sense the larger needs and implica- 
tions of international attempts to solve problems. The program will 
thus provide both an atmosphere of international involvement as well 
as courses like the Church and the Third World, World Poverty, 
Development and Liberation, Theology of Revolution. 

In addition to the courses offered, the Program of Mission Studies 
plans to regularly sponsor broader projects in missionary education. 
A second symposium on the missions is planned for the Fall. The 
topic in 1970 was "The Missionary Image Today." A ten-day work- 
shop or institute for missionaries on furlough, "Mission: 1971," was 
sponsored in March, 1971 and with some adaptation will probably be 
an annual event. At present, discussion is taking place that the 
Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools sponsor the annual meeting 
for mission specialists that until now has been held at the Bergamo 
Center of Dayton University. 

For the 1971-72 school year Bellarmine School of Theology 
(BST), the Catholic Theological Union (CTU) and the Lutheran 
School of Theology (LSTC) have highlighted the following course 
offerings in the Mission Programs: 

Fall Quarter: 

EARLY EXPANSION OF CHRISTIANITY: L. NEMER (CTU) 
THEOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE ON MISSIONS: J. BOBERG (CTU) 
READINGS IN MISSION AREA STUDIES: J. BOBERG (CTU) 
INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY OF RELIGIONS: J. HARDON (BST) 



38 



THE MISSION OF PAUL AT CORINTH: W. THOMPSON (BST) 
PROTESTANT MISSIOLOGY: FROM THE REFORMATION TO THE GREAT 

CENTURY: J. SCHERER (LSTC) 
SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION: (TO BE ARRANGED) 

Winter Quarter: 

CHRISTIANIZATION OF EUROPE: L. NEMER (CTU) 
CHRISTIANITY IN WORLD HISTORY: J. BOBERG (CTU) 
DEVELOPMENT OF THE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY: J. BOBERG 
(CTU) 

THEOLOGY OF REVOLUTION: J. PAWLIKOWSKI (CTU) 

RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE TODAY: R. OCHS (BST) 

CHURCHES IN AMERICA: FROM MISSION FIELD TO SENDING 

CHURCH: J. SCHERER (LSTC) 
CHURCHES IN MISSIONARY SITUATION: J. SCHERER (LSTC) 

Spring Quarter: 

29th century imperialism and mission: l. nemer (ctu) 
contemporary mission problems: j. boberg (ctu) 
introduction to missiology: j. boberg (ctu) 
cultural anthropology: (to be arranged) 
modern problems in christian evangelization: j. hardon 
(bst) 

incarnation and redemption in non-christian religions: 
j. doyle (bst) 

christian approach to men of other faiths: j. scherer 

(LSTC) 



PASTORAL TEACHER EDUCATION 

During the 1971-72 academic year, the Center for Studies in Reli- 
gious Education will offer a closely supervised and evaluated pro- 
gram in a Pastoral Teacher Education. Analogous to Clinical Pastoral 
Education (CPE), this program will be offered to students of the 
Cluster Schools and others in a pilot model rising out of the 
Danforth Conference on the educational mission of the church, held 
in the fall of 1970 at the Center for Continuing Education, University 
of Chicago. 



39 



The first year the Center will accept six students for each quar- 
ter for intensive supervised training and experience in the edu- 
cational ministry. While this program will take place in a "laboratory 
school" (St. Thomas Apostle High School), the program is aimed at 
the total educational task of the minister and will stress the trans- 
ferability of educational skills and content. 

The Cluster student who desires to enroll must register with the 
Center after consulting with his own academic dean. Because of the 
intensity of the program, he will be limited to no more than six quar- 
ter hours or two courses of other subjects during his quarter of PTE. 
He must be in his last or next-to-last year before ordination or gradu- 
ation. Upon completion of PTE he will receive certification from 
the Center and such credit as his Cluster school will grant. 



PASTORAL TRAINING LABORARY 

Nature 

The Pastoral Training Laboratory is a response to the present 
needs of full time parish personnel. Pastor, associates, sisters and 
lay people who are engaged in pastoral work want to develop pro- 
fessional pastoral skills. Skills are not developed in a classroom but 
through a laboratory situation in which the specifics of actual ex- 
perience are examined. Each professional needs feedback from peers 
and resource people to evaluate his on-going ministry. 

The era of the pastoral solo flight, the star performer, or the 
rugged individualist is past. We work as a team or perish pastorally. 
Team building is something we learn by practice. Each person en- 
rolling in the laboratory will come as a member of a team and receive 
help in relating to the staff back in the parish office. 

Everyone who is working in a full time pastoral situation will be 
supervising deacons, lay helpers, or others working in part time 
capacity, therefore one must see the actual dynamics of these relation- 
ships and seek to maximize their productiveness. 



40 



Objectives 

1. To help each "pastor" review a particular pastoral incident of the 
past week. The staff and the group would offer feedback and in- 
sight. The pastoral incidents could be: (l) critical incidents such 
as death, drug addiction, marital break-up; (2) the routine house- 
calls; (3) participation in parish or community organizations. 

2. To learn how to build a team or parish staff, establish priorities, 
set goals, and build in accountability. The data would be each 
person's on-going relationship with his own team. 

3. To acquire some of the tools of supervision, e.g., how to deal 
with authority and conflict. Supervisory models would be tested 
through role playing. 

4. Other issues would normally be raised such as: What is my 
"working" theology? What is my self concept of priest, sister, or 
minister ? What personality factors interfere with my ministry ? 

Staff: Fr. Dennis Geaney (Chairman), Sr. Lois Dideon, Fr. 
Thomas Leahy. 

To enroll or make inquiries write: Rev. Dennis J. Geaney, O.S.A.; 
Catholic Theological Union; 5401 South Cornell Avenue; Chicago,. 
Illinois 60615. 



CHICAGO CLUSTER OF THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 

A basic reason which motivated the founders of Catholic Theologi- 
cal Union to select the Hyde Park site for the new school was the 
excellent prospect for ecumenical cooperation with neighboring 
theological schools. Arrangements were worked out during the 
Winter Quarter of 1969 whereby an informal cooperation was estab- 
lished between three schools: Lutheran School of Theology, Catho- 
lic Theological Union and Chicago Theological Seminary. The aca- 
demic deans agreed on the following points: (1) that a list of course 
offerings be drawn up each term and that students be permitted to 
take courses at any of the other schools without additional costs; 
(2) that the deans exchange information regarding faculty, and in- 
dicate which faculty members might be interested in teaching joint 
courses. 



41 



During the summer and fall of 1969 the circle of interested semi- 
naries was widened to include Meadville/Lombard Theological 
School (also in Hyde Park), Bethany Theological Seminary in sub- 
urban Oak Brook, and De Andreis Vincentian Seminary in Lemont. 
The Jesuit Bellarmine School of Theology in North Aurora was 
contemplating a move to Hyde Park, and maintained close liaison 
with the emerging cluster. 

The President of Catholic Theological Union acted as chairman 
pro-tern of the Common Council, which was made up of the presi- 
dents and deans of the interested schools. 

Agreements regarding cross-registration and reciprocal library 
privileges were formulated for the 1969-70 academic year. Each 
school submitted a statement on its resources and expectations in 
relation to the Cluster. 

Through the good offices of the American Association of Theo- 
logical Schools, a grant was obtained for the services of Dr. John 
Dillenberger of the Graduate Theological Union at Berkeley to 
serve as consultant and catalyst for the development of the Cluster. 
Dr. Dillenberger met with the Common Council in February and 
March, 1970. 

The formal launching of the Chicago Cluster of Theological 
Schools took place at an all-faculties dinner held at Chicago Theo- 
logical Seminary on May 4, 1970. A full time coordinator was en- 
gaged in the person of Dr. Robert J. Flinn, of the Divine Word 
Mission Society, one of the corporate members of CTU. 

Bellarmine School of Theology had decided to move to the Lu- 
theran campus in Hyde Park in September, 1970, and is a full 
member of the new Cluster. Northern Baptist Seminary of Oak 
Brook requested membership and was voted in October 8, 1970. 
The Cluster was legally incorporated as the Chicago Cluster of 
Theological Schools on April 26, 1971. 



42 



COURSE OFFERINGS 




BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES 
HISTORICAL AND DOCTRINAL STUDIES 
CHRISTIAN MISSION AND MINISTRY 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



Courses offered during the academic year 1971-72 are listed below. 
Three departments make up the school of theology of the Catholic 
Theological Union: The Department of Biblical Literature and Lan- 
guages; the Department of Historical and Doctrinal Studies; and 
the Department of Christian Mission and Ministry. The courses are 
divided into three series: "300" series (courses prerequisite to grad- 
uate work at either the M.A. or M.Div. level) ; "400" series (grad- 
uate level courses representing generally the core courses for the 
M.Div. degree); "500" series (graduate level seminars developing 
special questions in biblical, traditional and contemporary theology) . 

All courses are three quarter-hour courses, that is, classes are 
scheduled 150 minutes per week for ten weeks. The eleventh week 
is evaluation week. 



A. DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES 
(BLL) 

Staff: Geron Fournelle (Chairman), Robert Karris, Callistus Langerholz, 
Hayim G. Perelmuter, Carroll Stuhlmueller. 

BLL 300: OLD TESTAMENT: INTRODUCTION 

Select passages from the books and major traditions of the entire Old 
Testament will be studied against the background of Israel's history, 
religion and literary genres. The primary goal of this course is a con- 
trolled knowledge of the Old Testament in preparation for future in- 
depth study of individual sections. Yearly. STUHLMUELLER 

(Winter) 

BLL 305: NEW TESTAMENT : INTRODUCTION 

The writings of the New Testament will be presented in their historical, 
cultural, religious and sociological context in the Greco-Roman world. 
Introduction to the methodological tools employed in New Testament 
research and to the diverse theologies that comprise the New Testament 
witness to Jesus of Nazareth. Yearly. KARRIS 

(Fall) 



44 



BLL 315: THE BIBLE: ITS FORMATION AND 
INTERPRETATION 



The formation of the Bible in terms of the "word" and its revelation 
of God's presence as Savior within the community of faith. The emer- 
gence of a sacred tradition of holy writ, interpreted anew by and for 
each generation. Topics of a special study include: biblical inspiration 
and inerrancy; revelation, scripture and tradition; liturgy and the scrip- 
tures; the senses of scripture; Canon; texts and versions; textual criti- 
cism. Yearly. FOURNELLE and STUHLMUELLER 

(Spring) 

BLL 325: INTRODUCTORY HEBREW 

An introductory course for those who have not previously studied 
Hebrew^ Yearly. FOURNELLE 

(Spring) 

N.B. Advanced courses in the biblical languages will be offered by the 
department according to the needs of the students. 

BLL 400: HISTORICAL EXEGETICAL STUDY OF THE 
PENTATEUCH 

Historical background of the Old Testament milieu. Hebrew position in 
the world picture. Exegesis of Genesis 1-11. Patriarchal narratives. 
Exodus event as central to the understanding of the O.T. 

FOURNELLE 
(Fall) 

BLL 405: THE DEUTERONOMIC HISTORY 

1972-1973 FOURNELLE 
BLL 410: PRE-EXILIC PROPHECY 

The origin of the "classical" or "writing" Prophets in the unique genius 
of Mosaic Religion and in the early prophetic guilds. An exegesis of 
key passages in Amos, Hosea, and particularly Jeremiah, to appreciate 
their particular reaction to the religious contribution to the prophetic 
movement. 1972-1973 STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 415: EVOLVING FORM OF PROPHETISM DURING THE 
EXILE AND POST-EXILIC PERIODS 

The salient role of Ezekiel and Deutero-Isaiah during the pivotal period 
of the exile. Later subservience of the prophetic movement to priestly 
legalism or to the apocalyptic form of postexilic Judaism. The study will 
be undertaken by means of key texts within the prophets. 1971-1972. 

STUHLMUELLER 



45 



BLL 420: THE PSALMS 

The psalms investigated against the background of biblical religion and 
other ancient Near Eastern religions. Various literary types. The psalms 
as representative of major religious movements in Israel. 1972-1973. 

STUHLMUELLER 
(Spring) 

BLL 425: OLD TESTAMENT WISDOM LITERATURE 

The wisdom movement in Israel and the ancient Near East. Problems of 

the "wise men." Retribution considered as thematic to study. Yearly. 

FOURNELLE 
(Winter) 

BLL 430: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MATTHEW 
Within the structure and the purpose of the Gospel, Matthew will be 
studied as a Pastor in his community in applying Jesus' teaching to his 
own situation. Yearly. LANGERHOLZ 

(Fall) 

BLL 432: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MARK 
Introduction to Gospel form — and redaction — criticism. Exegesis of the 
Gospel. Mark's place in the theology of the primitive community. 
1972-1973. KARRIS 

BLL 435: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO LUKE 
Introduction to form and redaction criticism. Exegesis of the entire gos- 
pel with special reference to the most recent and the most significant 
redaction critical studies. Luke's place in the theologies of the Early 
Church. Yearly. ^ ~ KARRIS 

(Spring) 

BLL 440: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO JOHN 
A critical-exegetical approach to John's text to arrive at his sources and 
to evaluate his theology, particularly on the mission of the Son and 
the Church. Yearly. LANGERHOLZ 

(Winter) 

BLL 450: PAULINE THEOLOGY 

Pauline thought seen in his debt to and use of theological and cultural 
traditions and his theological disputes with his opponents. 1972-1973. 

KARRIS 

BLL 455: PAULINE EXEGESIS: ROMANS 

Methodology used in the exegesis of a Pauline epistle. Paul's theological 
and cultural milieu. Detailed exegesis of the entire epistle. The epistles 
treated differ from year to year. Romans offered 1971-72. 

KARRIS 
(Winter) 



46 



BLL 500: SEMITIC THOUGHT AND CULTURE 

Directed research and class discussion, centering on such elements of 
Israelite daily life as: Hebrew language and psychology; social life of 
the people; commerce and industry; labor and sports; natural topog- 
raphy; climate and rainfall; etc. Extended lectures on the Hebrew lan- 
guage are directed towards those students who do not intend a formal 
study of the language. Yearly. STUHLMUELLER 

(Winter) 

BLL 502: PROBLEM OF AN O.T. THEOLOGY 
The question to be discussed is the possibility of a "theology" of the 
O.T. as differentiated from a "history of religious thought" in the O.T. 
Views of Burrows, Eichrodt, von Rad, de Vaux, Vriezen, Wright, etc., 
to be considered. 1972-1973. FOURNELLE 

BLL 508: BIBLICAL THEOLOGY OF CREATION AND CHAOS 
Creation texts will be studied as indicators of the mystery of salvation, 
in which divine goals clash with human weakness and sinfulness, in- 
cluding chaos, yet leading to a new creation. The course will include 
eschatology and apocalyptic. 1972-1973. STUHLMUELLER 

(Spring) 

BLL 510 (and HDS 510) : THE CHRISTOLOGIES OF THE EARLY 

CHURCH 

In the Early Church the significance of Jesus' life, death and resurrection 
was interpreted according to diverse theological and philosophical models. 
The Christologies of selected Apostolic Fathers. Christologies of selected 
Apologists. ' HAYES and KARRIS 

(Winter) 

BLL 518: INTERTESTAMENTAL LITERATURE 
Historico-cultural- religious developments of the period. Jewish apocalyp- 
tic and its influence on the religious thought of the Jews. Implications 
for New Testament study. 1972-1973. FOURNELLE 

BLL 520: LITURGY OF THE SYNAGOGUE: I 
A survey of worship forms in the contemporary American Synagogue 
with special reference to the common thread and variations in the Jewish 
denominaitons, Orthodox, Conservative and Reform. This course will, 
over a two-year cycle, offer the students an in-depth view of the entire 
Jewish Liturgical cycle. PERELMUTER 

(Fall) 

BLL 521: LITURGY OF THE SYNAGOGUE: II 

The liturgy of the Day of Atonement. 1972-1973. PERELMUTER 



47 



BLL 522: LITURGY OF THE SYNAGOGUE: III 

Liturgy of the Pilgrim Festivals (Passover, Pentecost and Tabernacles) 

and the "minor festivals" and the Jewish rites de passage. 1972-1973. 

PERELMUTER 
(Spring) 

BLL 523: CONTEMPORARY JEWISH THOUGHT 
An examination of the basic Jewish influence in contemporary thought 
and the influences shaping Jewish thinkers and theologians of our time. 
Existentialism, Mysticism, Zionism as they influence Orthodoxy, Con- 
servatism and Reform as well as the secular scene, will be examined. 
Yearly. PERELMUTER 

(Spring) 

BLL 524: READINGS IN RABBINIC LITERATURE: I 

Ethics of the Fathers. Careful examination of a Mishna text which gives 

an insight into Rabbinic thought and methodology. Yearly. 

PERELMUTER 
(Fall) 

BLL 525: READINGS IN RABBINIC LITERATURE: II 
An examination of Rabbinic interpretation and variations on themes 
from the Book of Genesis. Yearly. PERELMUTER 

(Fall) 

BLL 356: RABBINIC JUDAISM AND THE EARLY CHURCH 
An examination of the nature of Rabbinic Judaism out of which Chris- 
tianity emerged and with which Christianity co-existed over the cen- 
turies. An effort at achieving an insight into the approach and the mind 
of Rabbinic Judaism through an examination of the pertinent literature. 
1972-1973. PERELMUTER 

BLL 527: READINGS FROM JEWISM SOURCES: I 

Readings from Midrash Mekilta, a Rabbinic Commentary on the Exodus. 

1972-1973. PERELMUTER 

BLL 528: READINGS FROM JEWISH SOURCES: II 

A Rabbinic view of the first ten chapters of Genesis as seen through 

readings from Midrash Rabba. 1972-1973. PERELMUTER 

BLL 530: QUMRAN 

The Qumran sectaries and their "Library" will be studied for the light 
they can throw on biblical studies, particularly the New Testament and 
its community. FOURNELLE 

(Spring) 



48 



BLL 535: THE RESURRECTION TEXTS IN THE GOSPELS AND 
ST. PAUL 

The biblical background of the theme of resurrection. The hermeneutic 
of the empty tomb and apparitions. 1972-1973. LANGERHOLZ 



BLL 540: CHRISTIAN APOCALYPTICISM 

Its Christology, Ecclesiology and Eschatology as presented in the Book 
of Revelations. LANGERHOLZ 

(Spring) 



BLL 555: THEOLOGY OF THE "WORD OF GOD" 
With the O.T. prophetical theology of the "Word of God" as back- 
ground, the '"Good News" is studied in selected passages of the N.T. 
literature. . LANGERHOLZ 

(Spring) 



BLL 560: "MINISTRY" IN THE NEW TESTAMENT 

How the early Christian community understood and related the Diakonia, 

the Ministry, to the Word, to prayer, and to the "Saints." 

LANGERHOLZ 
(Winter) 



BLL 572: THE ETHICAL TEACHING OF THE EARLY CHURCH 
How do the words, life, death and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth 
function ethically in the Early Church? How and why did the Early 
Church borrow its ethical norms from its Jewish and Gentile contempo- 
raries? The Sermon on the Mount. The Epistle of James. Paul. The 
Pastoral Epistles. The Didache. The Shepherd of Hermas. The Apol- 
ogists. The Sentence of Sextus. * KARRIS 

(Spring) 



B. DEPARTMENT OF HISTORICAL AND DOCTRINAL STUDIES 
(HDS) 

Staff: Roger Arnold, Nicholas Crotty (Sabbatical), Zachary Hayes (Chair- 
man), D ami en Isabell, Basil Johnson, Jerome Knies, Hugh McElwain, 
Eric Meyer, Lawrence Nemer, Gilbert Ostdiek, John Pawlikowski, 
Donald Skerry. 



49 



HDS 300: DOCTRINAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE EARLY 

CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY 
An analysis of emerging theological themes in the early Church Writers 
and Councils. Special emphasis on Christological and Trinitarian themes. 
Yearly. McELWAIN 

(Fall) 



HDS 302: THE EARLY EXPANSION OF CHRISTIANITY 
A study of the Church as it encounters new cultures — as it moves out 
of a familiar world into a strange world. An analysis of how the new 
affected its institutions, theology and religious life, and of how the 
Christian Community in turn affected the social and political life of the 
world it encountered. Major considerations will be: the Jewish Chris- 
tian Community becoming Greek (Early Theology and Heresies, Basic 
Institutions), becoming Roman (the African Experience, Political- 
Ecclesial Structures, the Golden Age of the Fathers), becoming Byzan- 
tine (Cesaro-Papism and Episcopalism, the Christological and Trinitarian 
Debates, Leo I and Primacy) while at the same time elsewhere becoming 
something new (Barbarian Invasions, Gregory I and a new world). 
Yearly. NEMER 

(Fall) 



HDS 305: HISTORY OF THEOLOGY IN THE MIDDLE AGES 

A critical, Christian, theological evaluation of the effort, presupposi- 
tions, and conclusions of a select number of medieval theologians from 
Boethius and Pseudo-Denis to Pope Leo X: 
I. Neo-platinonism; Christian humanism; 
II. Aristotelian metaphysics; the scholastic method; 

III. Nominalism; "The Via Moderna"; 

IV. The notion of reform. 

Yearly. KNIES 

(Winter) 



HDS 307: THE CHRISTIANIZATION OF EUROPE 
A study of the Church's encounter with pagan nations, of the evangeli- 
zation and conversion of these nations, of the development with Islam, 
of a synthesis of life. An analysis of how the task affected Church life 
and thought, and of how the Church affected the world. Major con- 
siderations will be given to: the Clovis Experience, the Medieval Mis- 
sionary, Charlemagne — an end and a beginning, the creation of the Papal 
States, corruption in the West and enlightenment in the East, the growth 
of a Christian culture: theology, philosophy, social and political struc- 
tures, the encounter with Islam-Crusades, the 13th — Greatest of Cen- 
turies, exile and breakdown. Yearly. NEMER 

(Winter) 



50 



HDS 310: CHRISTIANITY IN THE RENAISSANCE AND 
REFORMATION 

Factors influencing the breakdown of the medieval synthesis. Renais- 
sance thought and style chiefly in relationship to the Church. Writings 
of the Reformers, and the position of Trent. Yearly. 

NEMER and WICKS 
(Spring) 



HDS 415: TRENDS AND TENSIONS IN THE CHURCH IN THE 

19th and 20th CENTURIES 
This course will include a discussion of theological controversies of the 
19th Century and Vatican I: the Church and liberalism; modernism; 
the biblical, liturgical and ecumenical movements of the 20th Century; 
and the Church and totalitarian states, especially Nazi Germany. 1972- 
1973. - T.B.A. 

HDS 420: DEVELOPMENT OF CATHOLICISM IN THE U.S. 
Biographical studies. Special problems and achievements of the Ameri- 
can Church. 1972-1973. T.B.A. 



HDS 422: 19TH CENTURY EUROPE AND WORLD MISSION 
A study of the Church as it encounters the new world born of the French 
Revolution, of how it affects and is affected by social and political con- 
siderations, of imperialism (Church and State), and of the missionary 
expansion in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Major considera- 
tions will be given to: the Church's encounter with French and Italian 
political liberalism, with German philosophical and theological liberal- 
ism, with English scientific and political liberalism; the Church's re- 
sponse in the Syllabus of Errors and Vatican I; Europe in Asia and 
Africa; Mission as Structure; the hesitant growth of local Churches; 
a western Christianity in a non-western world. NEMER 

(Winter) 



HDS 430: THE PROBLEM OF GOD 

A detailed study of the meaning of Christian theistic faith in the light 
of the problems raised by contemporary atheism and scientific develop- 
ments. Yearly. HAYES (Sec. 1) 

MEYER (Sec. 2) 
(Fall) 



HDS 435: ORIGINS AND ESCHATOLOGY 

A study of the Christian symbols concerning the origins of man, the 
world and evil; a correlative investigation of finality and eschatological 
symbolism. Yearly. HAYES (Sec. 1) 

MEYER (Sec. 2) 
(Spring) 



51 



HDS 440: CHRISTOLOGY 

An investigation of the structure and meaning of the Christian under- 
standing of salvation with particular emphasis on the problem of Chris- 
tian origins. Yearly. HAYES (Sec. 1) and MEYER (Sec. 2) 

(Winter) 

HDS 445: THEOLOGY OF THE CHURCH 

A study of the origins of the Church; the relation of the Kingdom to 
the Church; the basic images and themes in Scripture and tradition; the 
development of ecclesiastical office; and the relation of the Church to the 
world. Yearly. MEYER (Winter) 

HAYES (Spring) 

HDS 447: CHURCH AND STRUCTURE 

A study of ecclesiological thought and attempts to concretize the theory, 
particularly in legal structures. The course involves historical survey, 
as well as examination of the contemporary tensions between theory 
and structure. Treats theory and practical problems of interpretation of 
law in the contemporary Church. Yearly. BONNER 

(Fail) 

HDS 450: THEOLOGY OF THE EUCHARIST 

Scriptural origins. Early liturgical texts. The Greek theological develop- 
ments. The growth of medieval piety and scholastic doctrine. The 
Reformation dispute. Rediscovery of the meal aspect and other contem- 
porary problems. Yearly. OSTDIEK (Fall) 

JOHNSON (Winter) 

HDS 455: SACRAMENTS OF INITIATION 

General sacramental theology and the problem of contemporary symbols. 
Christian initiation, its institutional process and theology. The disin- 
tegration of the initiation structural process and the resultant Western 
theology of baptism and confirmation. The problem of infant baptism, 
physical sacramentalism and the response of faith. Yearly. OSTDIEK 

(Fall) 

HDS 460: SACRAMENTS OF HEALING AND VOCATION 
Conversion in the New Testament. The process from one conversion 
to many conversions, from public to private penitential structures and the 
theological implications of this change. Prayer for the sick and the de- 
velopment of the "last anointing." Marriage as a secular event and the 
scholastic sacrament of marriage. The laying-on of hands in the New 
Testament. Ordination to a specific function and the necessity for leader- 
ship qualities. Yearly. OSTDIEK and JOHNSON 

(Spring) 



52 



HDS 470: DYNAMICS OF CHRISTIAN CONSCIENCE 
FORMATION 

The course will cover the following four topics: first, the phenomeno- 
logical analysis of the functions which make it possible for an individual 
to operate morally; secondly, the process whereby a person sets up for 
himself a particular value system; thirdly, the main obstacles to moral 
development; fourthly, the place of Christ in the development of a 
morally mature individual. ARNOLD 

(Fall) 

HDS 475: THEOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIAL ETHICS 
The course will attempt to establish the basis for the Christian commit- 
ment to social ethics. Some consideration will be given to biblical and 
doctrinal problems that have frequently lessened this commitment in the 
past. Readings will be from the works of Reinhold Niebuhr, Joannes 
Mete, H. R. Niebuhr, Rosemary Reuther and others. PAWLIKOWSKI 

(Spring) 

HDS 490: DEVELOPMENT OF CHRISTIAN SPIRITUALITY 

ISABELL 
(Fall) 

HDS 502: THEOLOGICAL METHODOLOGY 

An investigation of the method in theology proposed by Bernard Loner- 
gan, including functional specialties; horizons and categories; human 
good, values and beliefs; meaning; and religion. SKERRY 

(Spring) 

HDS 510 (and BLL 510): CHRISTOLOGIES OF THE EARLY 

CHURCH 

In the Early Church the significance of Jesus' life, death and resurrection 
was interpreted according to diverse theological and philosophical models. 
The Christologies of representative New Testament authors. Christolo- 
gies of selected Apostolic Fathers. Christologies of selected Apologists. 

HAYES and KARRIS 
(Winter) 

HDS 515: ART OF CHRISTIAN CELEBRATION 
A study of the nature of ritual and the laws of ritual development. 
Analysis of the constitutive elements of rite (sign and symbol, language, 
gesture, music, dance) and their relationship to the ministerial role in 
celebration. A consideration of certain problems and developments in 
liturgical experimentation. OSTDIEK and JOHNSON 

(Winter) 



53 



HDS 522: THEOLOGICAL IMPACT OF TEILHARD DE 
CHARDIN 

Discussion of the major writings of Teilhard on the fact of evolution 
and its implications on theology, especially in the areas of Origins, 
Christology and Church. McELWAIN 

(Fall) 

HDS 526: THOUGHT OF L. DEWART 

An investigation of the fundamental question raised by Dewart; the 
criticisms and reactions to his position; the development of his posi- 
tion in his latest writings. HAYES 

(Fall) 



HDS 535: ALTIZER AND RADICAL THEOLOGY 
Analysis of the movement called "radical theology." Catholic response 
to the "Death of God" theology. MEYER 

(Spring) 

HDS 570: THEOLOGY OF REVOLUTION 

An examination of historical, theological and contemporary readings on 
revolution. Authors to be read include Brinton, Fanon, Arendt, Dewart, 
Debray and Shaull. PAWLIKOWSKI 

(Winter) 

HDS 572: THE ETHICAL TEACHING OF THE EARLY CHURCH 
How do the worlds, life, death and resurrection of Jesus of Na2areth 
function ethically in the Early Church? How and why did the Early 
Church borrow its ethical norms from its Jewish and Gentile contem- 
poraries ? The Sermon on the Mount. The Epistle of James. Paul. The 
Pastoral Epistles. The Didache. The Shepher of Hermas. The Apolo- 
gists. The Sentence of Sextus. KARRIS 

(Spring) 

HDS 575: PRAYER AND SOCIAL ACTION 

An examination of prayer as a basic source for a commitment to social 
action. Readings from the biblical prophets, Medieval mystic literature, 
Luther, Jewish mystical literature, Buber, Heschel, Novak and Merton. 

PAWLIKOWSKI 
(Spring) 



54 



DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN MISSION AND MINISTRY 
(CEM). 



': John Boberg, Dismas Banner (Chairman), Lois Dideon, Dennis 
Geaney, Sebastian MacDonald, Eugene Mainelli, Robert Mallonee, 
Thomas More Newbold, Donald Skerry. 

CMM 300: THE CHRISTIAN IN HUMAN COMMUNITY 
This course introduces the student to the study of theology in terms of 
broad vision of human community. He is brought to an awareness of 
the varied communities of which he is a member, and of the influences 
they exert upon him. The implications for faith and theology of this 
communal context are stressed. Yearly. STAFF 

(Fall) 

CMM 305: THE CHRISTIAN IN A CULTURAL COMMUNITY 
Art, literature, audio-visual media, education and other benefits associated 
with the cultural community surrounding the student will be introduced 
and commented upon in this course. The interplay between man and his 
culture will be highlighted, especially the significant images that thrive in 
the present culture and mediate the theological enterprise. Yearly. 

STAFF 
(Fall) 

CMM 310: THE CHRISTIAN IN SOCIAL AND POLITICAL 
COMMUNITY 

The student's keen sensitivity to the society and the political structure 
about him. will be addressed in this course, in an effort to relate this 
vivid awareness to the life of faith and the function of theology. Special 
effort will be made to capture this important factor of human community 
on the local (i.e., Chicago and Hyde Park) level. Yearly. STAFF 

(Winter) 

CMM 315: THE PERSON AS LOCUS OF COMMUNITY 
The role of community in mediating faith and theology is ultimately 
reducible to the human person within community. An adequate intro- 
duction to the study of theology must lead the student to appreciate the 
dynamics of his own person as a communal agent, and the impact this 
has upon his approach to theology and his expectations from it. Yearly. 

STAFF 
(Winter) 

CMM 320: CHRISTIAN LIFE AND HOLINESS 

The obvious response of the student to a special Christian call is here 



55 



acknowledged, and the attempt is made to gather the implications of this 
vocation-response, in terms of the study of theology. Certain factors 
constitutive of this dialectic will be isolated, i.e.: prayer, celebration, 
worship, liturgy, asceticism, mysticism and especially the various strands 
of spirituality represented in the religious communities comprising CTU. 
Yearly. STAFF 

(Spring) 

CMM 325: CHRISTIAN MINISTRY TO CONTEMPORARY 
COMMUNITY 

The variety of approaches to community achieves a certain unity in 
ministry. The student approaches theology pastorally above all else, and 
rightfully expects his sense of mission to correspond to his sense of 
community. Ministry to community represents the fulness that alone in- 
troduces the student to the heart of theology. Yearly. STAFF 

(Spring) 

CMM 400: THE SOURCES OF PASTORAL PSYCHOLOGY 
An historical survey of contemporary psychotherapy, with emphasis on 
Freud, Jung and the trend toward existential synthesis in psychotherapy. 
Yearly. NEWBOLD 

(Fall) 

CMM 405: BASIC TYPES OF PASTORAL COUNSELING 
A discussion of the basic types of pastoral counseling in terms of goals, 
techniques and practices. A presentation and discussion of some typical 
situations in pastoral care. Yearly. NEWBOLD 

(Fall and Spring) 

CMM 410: GUIDANCE AND SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

An examination of the relationship between techniques from the fields 

of guidance and counseling and the minister's role as spiritual director. 

ISABELL 
(Winter) 

CMM 415: SELF-UNDERSTANDING OF THE MINISTER IN 

PASTORAL CARE 
A seminar based on the premise that men act out of images. We will 
seek to understand the self concept of ministers, which is presented in 
Scripture, the Church's Tradition, and Contemporary Religion so that 
each participant becomes more aware of his own self-understanding as 
a minister. MALLONEE 

(Winter) 

CMM 420: LEGAL ASPECTS OF THE SACRAMENTS 

A survey of present canonical prescriptions, conciliar norms and cur- 



56 



rent practical application of legislation regarding the administration and 
reception of the sacraments. Particular emphasis on matrimonial law 
and practice. Yearly. BONNER 

(Winter) 

CMM 425: STRUCTURES OF RELIGIOUS LIFE 
Theological background of religious structures and law, current norms 
of law dealing with religious. Principles and practical aspects of reli- 
gious life, its renewal and adaptation. BONNER 

(Spring) 

CMM 430: INTRODUCTION TO MISSIOLOGY 
A survey of Catholic thought on the missions up to and including Vati- 
can II: the nature and purpose of missions; missionary methods. 

BOBERG 
(Spring) 

CMM 435: THEOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES ON MISSION 
Examination and analysis of Vatican documents; new dimensions of a 
more eschatologically oriented theology, especially for problems of de- 
velopment and relation to Non-Christian religions. BOBERG 

(Fall) 

CMM 440: CHRISTIANITY IN WORLD HISTORY 
A study of Christianity's relation to culture and cultural change a. la van 
Leeuwen, Tillich, Dawson. BOBERG 

(Winter) 

CMM 450: PRACTICUM IN PREACHING 

A workshop style criticism of written and delivered sermons. Individual 
criticism and practice using video-tape equipment. SKERRY 

(Fall and Winter) 

CMM 455: SERMON DESIGN: METHODS AND THEORY 
Study and practice in the basic elements of sermon production: creative- 
ness in sermon preparation; determining the theme; organization; style; 
delivery; and judging results. SKERRY 

(Winter) 

CMM 462: SEMINAR ON THE ANALYSIS OF ADULT 

EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN THE CHURCH 
A survey of programs in churches for adults, with a critical analysis of 
their methods, goals and achievements, and the formulation of basic prin- 
ciples of adult educational programs in the church in the light of a proven 
need and the greater insistency upon the formation of this age level by 
Church authorities. * MAINELLI 

(Fall) 



57 



CMM 480-485-490: FIELD EDUCATION PROJECT: I, II, and III. 

GEANEY and DIDEON 
(Year long) 

CMM 495: CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION (CPE) 
CMM 496: PASTORAL TEACHER EDUCATION (PTE) 
CMM 497: PASTORAL INTERNSHIP (PI) 

CMM 495, 96, & 97: By arrangement with Director of Field Education. 

CMM 506: SEMINAR: THEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF 

FREUD AND JUNG 
A discussion of the Freudian texts on religion and morality. Reading 
and discussion of the texts of Jung on the nature of religious experience. 

NEWBOLD 
(Fall) 



CMM 508: EXISTENTIAL PSYCHOTHERAPY AND PASTORAL 
PRACTICE 

This course examines the important influence that existential philosophy 
has come to have upon the development of psychotherapy. Emphasis 
will be placed upon the contributions to psychotherapy made by the 
existential analysis and interpretation of individual experience in a crisis 
society. The authors studied will be: Paul Tillich, Ludwig Binswanger, 
Medard Boss, Thomas Hora, F. J. J. Buytendijk, Rollo May and Eugene 
Kahn. NEWBOLD 

(Spring) 



CMM 520: THE MINISTER AS MANAGER 

This course is designed to give potential priests skills in management, 
particularly as applied to voluntary organizations; relevant social science 
data will be explored through lectures, readings, laboratory exercises, 
case studies, and field experience covering specific areas of management 
practice, such as group decision-making, supervision, data collection, per- 
sonal style, and organizational models. T.B.A. 

(Winter) 



CMM 530: READINGS IN AREA STUDIES 

Individually guided reading program in the history and culture of spe- 
cific countries, as well as their present social, economic and religious 
situations. BOBERG 

(Fall) 



58 



CMM 535: DEVELOPMENT OF THE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY 
An investigation of the theological, psycliological and sociological basis 
of Christian community; the movement from non-community to com- 
munity through the stages of pre-evangelism, kerygma and catechesis; 
the relationship of community development on the socio-economic plane. 

BOBERG 
(Winter) 

CMM 540: CONTEMPORARY MISSION PROBLEMS 
A seminar that investigates the relation of mission to colonialism and 
the problems in a post-colonial period of nationalism. Individual stu- 
dents will be expected to concentrate on one country or area. BOBERG 

(Spring) 

CMM 550: THEOLOGY OF PREACHING 

An investigation of the biblical and theological foundations of the mean- 
ing and importance of preaching. A study of the phenomenology of 
human speech in an attempt to correlate the biblical and theological with 
today's preacher. SKERRY 

(Fall) 

CMM 555: COMMUNICATIONS MEDIA : THEIR EFFECTS 
AND USES 

An exploration of the cultural influences of communications media, his- 
torical as well as contemporary, especially the way in which they have 
effected communication trends, perception, value formation, and their 
meaning for the communication of the Word of God. SKERRY 

(Spring) 

CMM 560: SEMINAR ON THE EDUCATIONAL MISSION OF 
THE MINISTRY: GOALS, PRIORITIES, PROBLEMS, 
PROGRAMS AND METHODS 
An exploration of the educational aspect of the ministry and the various 
forms it takes, not primarily in the schools, but in the ordinary func- 
tioning of the priestly office wherever it is exercised. The stress here is 
on the Minister himself as "communicator," and how he can do this 
more effectively precisely as educator, or as one who helps others in the 
process of understanding their experiences in the full Christian dimen- 
sion. MAINELLI 

(Spring) 



59 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS — 19^fr-197tf 



FIRST YEAR COMMUNITY OR DIOCESE HOME 



R AT TT<r T 


O. V .LJ. 


Fort Atkinson, Iowa 


RAT TFT? F> 


o. V .xJ. 


Toledo, Ohio 


RT TTKTOW/QT^T P 
DUJlNUWoM, Jr. 


C P 


Chicago, Illinois 


f AT T ARAM V 


O F M 
v^.JT.lVl. 


Bridgeport, Connecticut 


t~ONTT FV T 


C P 


Chicago, Illinois 




c vn 


Girard, Pennsylvania 


rOTTTM(^T4 AM P 
\^\J x 1 llN\jrJri/\lVx, Jr. 




Jacksonville, Alabama 


CTTRRANT Tj 


O <s A' 


Dublin, Ireland 


DFFFFNR A TTGH T 


nc a 

W.o./v. 


St. Louis, Missouri 


DFTnJT^^FISI r 

XJ -C1N 1 JJ JJdN , IV . 


W.Jrream. 


DePere, Wisconsin 


FELDNER W 


O. V .XJ . 


1VX11 WdliKcC, W lMjOlioin 


FENSKE, T. 


O.F.M. 


l tti iiid., vyinu 


FISCHER A 


O F M 


Trpn frvn T 1 1 i n rvJ c 
X ICllUJUL, XlllllLrlo 


FIOWFRS R 


S V D 


^t'Arm T aire* T on ri 
JlXjLllx X^aJtvC, lUWa 


OTNT<\ P 


O <s M 
v/.o.ivi. 


Columbus, Ohio 


GRTJRR F 

VJIV \_J XJXJ ^ X • 


O Pr^pm 
vy.x iduii. 


OallLd. -TC, 1NCW XVXCXIHJ 


RATTTR ARTT-T F 
xi/v^rvJD/Vxv l xx, n,. 




Hilbert, ^Wisconsin 


ROFFMANT Or 
nvjr j?ivx/vin , vj. 


p pp ^ 

V^.JT JT.o. 


ncrmisr<jn , wrcgQn 


nu 1 1 in vj , xv. 


C PP ^ 

v^. JrJr .o. 


v^ciiria., wnio 


TAf^TTFFTn T 


O F M 

KJ.r ,1VL. 


waK jjrooK, Illinois 


T A TVTTTVT F 
JAlNlxS., xi. 


Q V Fi 


Elyria, Ohio 


TFTvTHP A C7 AT^ R 


AC A 


Chicago, Illinois 


TOFTNKfYM D 

J WlTLlN OVJlN , JLV. 


cvn 

O. V .X-J . 


±VXUrcd.U.VlllC, JL,UUlMalla 


VF,XTTV7rYD A FN 
rvxliNxJZiVJKA, U. 


o.VU 


Chicago, Illinois 


xvWxllN, 1. 




uerroit, lviicxngdn 


VP A "MTV F 
JSJx AIN 1 Zj, J}. 


c pp 


Atwater, Ohio 


T A NT/^FTSITT A MP T 
JLA-LN VjrJ2lNrvA.iVJ.Jr, J. 


C PP <N 

v^.Jtr Jr ,o. 


or. jnenry, wnio 


T A A TVTT A "D 


O. V.JJ. 


New Orleans, Louisiana 




l^.r r.o. 


Richmond, Virginia 


T T TFRRFRT <i 


C P 


r l on ss ant, ivii b s oun 


A/1W A P TMThV P 
1YLC^Ax\ llNxi I , Jr. 


v^.o.op. 


Toledo, Ohio 


~\Jfs-fYI TTT T A "NT f 
MCV^UxLXAiN, L,. 


i^.o.op. 


Staten Island, New York 


MARTINEZ, V. 


O.S.M. 


San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico 


MASSARO, P. 


C.S.Sp. 


Norbert, Pennsylvania 


MOJNJN1JN, JJ. 


n pp c 
L.rr.o. 


Russia, Ohio 


MONZYK, J. 


CP. 


Washington, Missouri 


NAIRN, T. 


O.F.M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


O' GRADY, D. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


PATTEN, P. 


C.S.Sp. 


Detroit, Michigan 


PSCZOLA, R. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


ROCHFORD, E. 


S.V.D. 


Cedar Rapids, Iowa 


RYAN, J. 


CP. 


Cleveland, Ohio 




60 





SIEG, R. 


KJ.r .M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Turin "nt 


o. V .D. 


Fowler, Michigan 


TIT r\\ X A \T T 

I HUMAN, J. 




Cincinnati, Ohio 


URODA, b. 


O. V .U. 


utriroiL, iviicriigdn 


\T A r\M AT "D 

VAUNAL, K. 


O. V .u. 


v^icvciana, wmo 


VANDhRVhM, JL. 


v/.Jr rcdiii. 


i^uxernDurg, w ibconi>in 


WARRINGTON, R. 


A C A 

U.O.A. 


South Holland, Illinois 


W £,11V1/\1\|, 1VI. 


C S Sr> 


PiftsKnrch Ppnnsvlvania 


WINTER, R. 


CPP.S. 


Rensselaer, Indiana 


YEARGIN, R. 


CP. 


Reno, Navada 



SECOND YEAR COMMUNITY OR DIOCESE HOME 



ALDWORTH, T. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


ANICH, K. v 


S.V.D. 


Mukwonago, Wisconsin 


AUBREY, K. 


S.V.D. 


Des Plaines, Illinois 


BERNARD, R. 


S.V.D. 


St. Martinsville, Louisiana 


BALLARD, J. 


O.F.M. 


Memphis, Tennessee 


BILSKI, T. 


O.F.M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


BOU, P. 


S.V.D. 


Chicago, Illinois 


CAPALBO, K. 


O.F.M. 


Bellwood, Illinois 


CARLOS, J. 


O.F.M. 


Joliet, Illinois 


CERTIK, R. 


CP. 


Chicago, Illinois 


CHARBONNEAU, G. 


O.S.M. 


Detroit, Michigan 


COMELLA, G. 


O.S.M. 


Waukegan, Illinois 


DEAN, E. 


O.F.M. 


Nashville, Tennessee 


DIESBOURG, R. 


M.S.C. 


Geneva, Illinois 


FEDERSPIEL, J. 


CP. 


Port Washington, Wisconsin 


GRAHAM, J. 


S.V.D. 


Epping, N.S.W., Australia 


HANEY, M. 


O.F.M. 


Columbus, Nebraska 


HILGERT, J. 


CP. 


Mason, Michigan 


HORSTMAN, J. 


S.V.D. 


Cloverdale, Ohio 


JADCHEW, J. 


CPP.S. 


Parma, Ohio 


JENKINS, L. 


S.V.D. 


Palm Desert, California 


JESCHKE, R. 


S.V.D. 


Elmhurst, Illinois 


KESTERSON, J. 


O.F.M. 


Indianapolis, Indiana 


KMIEC, W. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


KRATZ, C. 


O.Praem. 


Green Bay, Wisconsin 


KUTSICK, A. 


S.V.D. 


Detroit, Michigan 


LESCHAK, M. 


S.V.D. 


Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 


LUKSETICH, D. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


McCABE, M. 


O.F.M. 


Madison Lake, Minnesota 


MENCSIK, J. 


CPP.S. 


Troy, Ohio 


MERTEN, T. 


O.F.M. 


Omaha, Nebraska 


NEVILLE, T. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


OVERMANN, J. 


S.V.D. 


Jesup, Iowa 


POPPE, D. 


CP. 


Louisville, Kentucky 


RECKAMP, R. 


S.V.D. 


Harvard, Illinois 



61 



REITHMAIER, P. 




O.S.M. 


FranJkfort, Illinois 


SPENCER, W. 




O.F.M. 


West Monroe, Louisiana 


SPERANZA, P. 




M.S.C 


Wheaton, Illinois 


TAYLOR, D. 




Pittsburgh 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


W7TT T T> 

WILL, R. 




C.Fr.b. 


Chickasaw, Ohio 


WOLFF, R. 




S.V.D. 


Dayton, Ohio 


THIRD YEAR 


COMMUNITY OR DIOCESE 


HOME 


BAKER, J. 




M.S.C. 


Lebanon, Pennsylvania 


BRENNAN, P. 




CP. 


St. Louis, Missouri 


BUDENHOLZER, F. 


S.V.D. 


/"J _ J TT'11 Tit* 

Clarendon Hills, Illinois 


CHENEVEY, R. 




C.PP.S. 


Canal Fulton, Ohio 


COENS, F. 




O.F.M. 


Quincy, Illinois 


DANNA, S. 




O.F.M. 


Monroe, Louisiana 


DAY, J. 




CP. 


TT" . All Til ' * 

East Alton, Illinois 


GUILLORY, C. 




S.V.D. 


Lafayette, Louisiana 


KAVCAK, J. 




M.S.C 


Nazareth, Pennsylvania 


KOLEGA, R. 




C.PP.S. 


Chicago, Illinois 


McGRATH, R. 




O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


MILLER, J. 




CPP.S. 


Lima, Ohio 


OHNER, J. 




O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


PATTERSON, J. 




C.PP.S. 


xyy . i ,-,,11. '11-^ T 11-.+^*. 

Walcottviile, Indiana 


PAWLICKI, J. 




S.V.D. 


Bay City, Michigan 


PFEIFER, J. 




O.F.M. 


Humphrey, Nebraska 


QUINN, P. 




O.S.A. 


Evergreen Park, Illinois 


SCHWIETERMAN, D. 


S.V.D. 


Celina, Ohio 


SIMON, M. 




CPP.S. 


La Monte, Minnesota 


STITH, E. 




CPP.S. 


Akron, Ohio 


WEBBER, D. 




CP. 


Des Moines, Iowa 


FOURTH YEAR 


COMMUNITY OR DIOCESE 


HOME 


BOWENS, C. 




O.S.M. 


County Cork, Ireland 


BROWN, B. 




O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


BRUMM, G. 




S.V.D. 


Townsville, Australia 


CAMPBELL, J. 




M.S.C. 


"ml 1 ■ Til" 

Elmhurst, Illinois 


CARDY, W. 




O.F.M. 


• Til" 

Chicago, Illinois 


CORBETT, P. 


Ft. Wayne-So. Bend 


O .1 T> _ J T 1 ' 

South Bend, Indiana 


CREPEAU, J. 




O.S.A. 


Detroit, Michigan 


DAVINO, L. 




O.F.M. 


" Til ! _ • 

Chicago, Ilhnois 


DOBUCKI, K. 




O.F.M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


FIGUREL, R. 




M.S.C 


Altoona, Pennsylvania 


FONCK, B. 




O.F.M. 


Elmhurst, Illinois 


GABRUS, A. 




O.F.M. 


Acnlan/-i \Y7i c rrvn c in 


HAMILL, W. 




O.S.A. 


Tulsa, Oklahoma 


KIRBY, J. 




S.V.D. 


Rialto, California 



62 



KORDEK, F. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


KUTYLO, P. 


S.V.D. 


Augusta, Georgia 


LESSARD, R. 


M.S.C 


East Hartford, Connecticut 


McCarthy, d. 


O.S.M. 


Country Cork, Ireland 


MILLARD, D. 


S.V.D. 


Mackay, Old, Australia 


O'CONNOR, M. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


PAYNE, C. 


O.F.M. 


Detroit, Michigan 


PICHITINO, J. 


C.PP.S. 


Carlsbad, New Mexico 


PIERK, G. 


S.V.D. 


Germany 


PINS, H. 


S.V.D. 


Earlville, Iowa 


RIEBE, G. 


S.V.D. 


Gardena, California 


SCHWAB, J. 


S.V.D. 


Deshler, Ohio 


SPRAGUE, J. 


M.S.C 


Waterton, New York 


STEINB RUNNER, J. 


C.PP.S. 


Burkettsville, Ohio 


SZUKALA, J. 


O.S.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


TIMP, F. 


S.V.D. 


Freeport, Minnesota 


VTTI, J. 


M.S.C. 


Nazareth, Pennsylvania 


O r£LlAL o 1 Ui/r IN I o V_-V^1V1IVI U ±N III 




HOME 


RUNDE, L. 


O.F.M. 


Teutopolis, Illinois 


STUDER, F. 


O.S.B. 


Collegeville, Minn. 



63